Essentially Rudd wrapped a big boost to health funding up in a political agenda that called the states’ right to exist into question.

While the Tasmanian result represents the decomposition of the old, the SA result reflects the weakness of the new.

Rudd and Gillard are campaigning against an arm of government. However, it is worth noting that they are also campaigning against the parties running them, including their own.

Even before the 2007 election, Rudd was using health as a basis for his anti-political agenda.

Easy in, easy out

Tuesday, 13 January 2009   State and federal politics   3 comments 

There is just a little bit of hypocrisy doing the rounds about Evan Thornley’s sudden decision to refuse a ministry spot and quit Victorian politics.

Review of 2008 – Labor

Wednesday, 24 December 2008   Key posts, State of the parties  Comments Off 

It was the political assault on the old power bases of the party that was the underlying theme of federal Labor in 2008.

Clinging to the wreckage

Monday, 1 December 2008   The Australian state  Comments Off 

… it seems the more the Liberals ditch what they stand for, the more they cling to Howard the man, rather than what he was supposed to stand for.

Spot the Liberal

Friday, 3 October 2008   State and federal politics  Comments Off 

So much for the election of a Liberal Premier shaking up Rudd’s federalism.

No revival, just decay – another update

Thursday, 25 September 2008   State and federal politics  Comments Off 

Labor can push emission cuts out to well beyond the political life of anyone in the government. Unfortunately the Murray crisis creates expectations over what it can do and highlights its impotence now.

Libs re-emerge to a changed landscape

Monday, 15 September 2008   State and federal politics  Comments Off 

The Nationals’ problem is not some demographic phenomenon of sun-seekers retiring on the NSW coast but a political one. They are the most obvious victims of an unravelling of the old two party system that is affecting all of the parties.

Earlier posts →

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